Client’s right to diagnostic information.  I think that all histories (done with adults who are able to have this conversation) should include the following discussion:
Do they know what they’ve been diagnosed with?
Also, do they know what it means? If they want to know, I break it down for them in laymen’s terms.
Do they agree with them? Most people want to understand what they’re diagnosed with, and have an opinion about what’s bothering them. 
What has their treatment looked like in the past? This is to see if they’ve gotten treatment that looks anything like a recommended treatment for their diagnosis. For example, a client whose been treated for a panic disorder should have at least heard of breathing and grounding exercises.
from Diagnosing: The 5 Step Empowerment Model (this was step 2)

Client’s right to diagnostic information.  I think that all histories (done with adults who are able to have this conversation) should include the following discussion:

Do they know what they’ve been diagnosed with?

Also, do they know what it means? If they want to know, I break it down for them in laymen’s terms.

Do they agree with them? Most people want to understand what they’re diagnosed with, and have an opinion about what’s bothering them. 

What has their treatment looked like in the past? This is to see if they’ve gotten treatment that looks anything like a recommended treatment for their diagnosis. For example, a client whose been treated for a panic disorder should have at least heard of breathing and grounding exercises.

from Diagnosing: The 5 Step Empowerment Model (this was step 2)

Recognize the person in front of you also has a story. This doesn’t always work, but many times showing compassion can yield compassion in return. Or at least some distant cousin of it. And when it doesn’t? It’s okay to walk away. We don’t owe anyone a relationship. Dignity and respect? Yes. It costs little to share, and frankly I think it’s a lot more costly NOT to respect someone’s inherent dignity, for you, for them and for society. But we don’t owe anyone our story or time or friendship, and if you can walk away, and think “that person’s walk must be really hard,” it’s actually a lot easier than stewing over what they’ve said or done.

Someone is stuck if…

“Can’t” is the response to every suggestion
In therapy, can’t is harder to overcome than just about anything else. I’m not talking about I can’t speak Mandarin, but can’t as far as coping skills and activities and future plans. I can’t do this, I can’t do that. It’s truly debilitating when you think about it. When someone it really means, “that would be difficult,” or “I choose not to”, the person using it is stuck.

from-3 Ways to Tell if Someone is Stuck

It’s always seemed odd to me that art therapy was its own thing, separate from “regular” therapy. As someone who has long struggled with verbal language, I’ve always thought that a therapist who was any good would be prepared to communicate with clients on their terms. Communication happens so many ways: verbally, physically, through art or song. Why wouldn’t I use all those tools when helping someone? And why wouldn’t I give them the chance to communicate with something other than spoken word if there was a better way?
from When Words Fail in Therapy

It’s always seemed odd to me that art therapy was its own thing, separate from “regular” therapy. As someone who has long struggled with verbal language, I’ve always thought that a therapist who was any good would be prepared to communicate with clients on their terms. Communication happens so many ways: verbally, physically, through art or song. Why wouldn’t I use all those tools when helping someone? And why wouldn’t I give them the chance to communicate with something other than spoken word if there was a better way?

from When Words Fail in Therapy